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FUTURE PROOFING AGAINST THE NEXT GENERATION OF CYBER ATTACKS

OUR GOAL IS TO ESTABLISH A TRAINING CENTRE

that capitalises on Australia’s technological leadership and advances knowledge and expertise in Advanced Cyber.

why you should engage

The benefits of involvement are extensive, including working with world-class experts, upskilling your workforce and being at the forefront of research and development.

meet the researchers

The team of leading researchers from around Australia

how it will be funded

The University of Adelaide is applying for ARC funding to establish the centre, up to a maximum of $5 million

partner contributions

What your organisations’ project-specifc in-kind contributions can include. The size of your ogranisation will influence the amount you conribute.

about

THE BACKGROUND

An increased dependence on computers and computer networks has also seen an increase in malicious cyberactivity, and much of it is not easy to detect.

The current patch-and-pray approach to cybersecurity doesn’t work. Everything is hackable, whether in an organisation or at home. Security incidents and breaches are costing companies, government, and individuals more than ever. Attackers are adopting advanced techniques, like artificial intelligence (AI), to hack faster and more effectively, including against advanced targets like banks, governments, Defence, and telecoms.

our goals

NEW THINKING IS REQUIRED

We need to understand the impact of human factors, the inevitability of vulnerabilities, and accept that we, and our devices, are the weakest link. Systems are now so complex they have moved beyond our comprehension. It’s imperative that we develop an advanced approach to cybersecurity that that will protect our systems from tomorrow’s attackers.

Furthermore, there is already a worldwide dearth of expertise in this area and cybercrime is on the rise. An Advanced Cyber Training Centre will nurture academic expertise and link PhD students with industry partners so crucial knowledge is developed and shared. It will seed a talent pool that will grow in years to come, into which industry will be able to tap for its future cyber recruitment.

WHY YOU SHOULD ENGAGE WITH THE CENTRE

Industry partners are essential to the success of this centre. Cyber and end user (non-cyber) industries are both welcome to partner with us, along with Government departments.

The benefits of involvement are extensive, including working with world-class experts, upskilling your workforce and being at the forefront of research and development that will protect Australia’s future as well as your own.

In addition to making a financial contribution, industry partners co-supervise a PhD student for at least 12 months over the 5-year life of the Training Centre. This means co-designing research projects and taking control of the objectives necessary to complete them.

You will translate research outcomes into industry ready applications, and you will create workplace-ready graduates with industry relevant skills, a proven track-record and experience.

To get involved please contact Professor Michael Webb

And please read the prospectus for further information

HOW WILL IT BE FUNDED?

The University of Adelaide is applying for ARC funding to establish the centre, up to a maximum of $5 million for 5 years. The expected proposal deadline is December 2022.

THE ARC FUNDING CAN BE USED FOR DIRECT COST SUCH AS

  • eligible personnel
  • student stipends
  • access to research and infrastructure facilities and technical workshop services
  • field research
  • expert services
  • equipment and consumables
  • publication, knowledge dissemination and outreach
  • specialised computer equipment and software
  • web hosting and development
  • workshops
  • essential travel costs.

There are no minimum cash contribution levels for Training Centre Partner Organisations. However, Centre proposals must demonstrate that their Partners’ combined cash and in-kind contributions will adequately support the Centre’s intended activities.

Additionally, Partners will normally be expected to host one or more doctoral students for a total of 12 months during the Centre’s lifespan, to train them in industry-relevant research.

pARTNER IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS

PARTNER ORGANISATIONS’ PROJECT-SPECIFIC IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS CAN INCLUDE:

Partner Organisations’ project-specific in-kind contributions can include:

  • researchers’ time
  • access to facilities, equipment, and databases
  • analytical and other services
  • equipment
  • materials and consumables
  • patents and licences
  • software
  • travel.

The size of your organisation will influence the amount you contribute.

Please note, where sponsorship is from an Australian entity it may qualify for a significant tax offset under the Government’s R&D tax incentive. This can be up to up to 43.5%.  More details and a link to the relevant Australian Government Business website are included in the prospectus.

FREQUENCY AND COST OF CYBER

A cybercrime was reported every 8 minutes in the 2020-1 financial year. Self-rpeported losses from cybercrime was more than $33billion.

HOW THEY GET US

Malware. Bots. Social engineering. Physical.

TYPES OF CYBERCRIME

Cyberespionage. Phishing. Non-Payment/Non-Delivery. Personal Data Breach. Corporate Data Breach. Identity Theft. Credit Card Fraud. Extortion. Romance Fraud. Tech Support. Investment. Hackers.

EXAMPLE THAT HIGHLIGHTS RISK

Need more proof of how important it is for us to take control?

An Australian teenager living with his Mum is said to have created an insidious spyware program so sophisticated that it allowed hardcore criminals to take control of victims’ computers.

BUILD TRUST WITH YOUR CLIENTS AND CUSTOMERS BY JOINING THIS INITIATIVE.

Contact

Professor Michael Webb

Bid Leader, and Director, Defence and Security Institute

The University of Adelaide

m.webb@adelaide.edu.au

+61 (0) 8 8313 0128